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WHEN I’M WRITING A KANJI AND COMPLETELY MESS UP THE LAST STROKE

ijustcanttoday:

nihononthego:

Super easy grammar lesson! Last time we learned to say ~てよかった, meaning “it’s good that…” Now, you can use the ば conditional to say you should have or shouldn’t have done something. Because it’s more or less a conditional statement, it roughly translates to: “If this would have/wouldn’t have…

Japanese… via cat tails.

(via fassnbender)

julieyumi:

ぐるぐる - guru guru - round and around, spinning

(via washi-kotoba)

WHEN I TRY CONJUGATING A JAPANESE VERB TO CAUSATIVE PASSIVE FORM

ijustcanttoday:

kanji-a-day:

734/2000

JLPT: N4

School Grade: 1st (6 years old)

This character derived from a pictograph of a crescent moon.

WHEN I TRY TO RECALL THAT NEW WORD I JUST LEARNED

ijustcanttoday:

kanji-a-day:

714/2000

JLPT: N2

School Grade: 3rd (8 years old)

This character is a combination of 自 self/nose and 畀 a Chinese-only character meaning “give,” which is lending the meaning of “prominent” here. Together they give “prominent nose,” now meaning just “nose.”

初めての楽しい日本語会話クラスに行った。ちょっと恥ずかしかったけど行ってよかったです。

nadinenihongo:

Guide to Self-Studying Japanese

A large proportion of Japanese learners self-study. Finding places to learn Japanese in a classroom environment can be difficult and expensive. Here’s a guide on how you can learn Japanese for free and from the comfort of your sofa.

When learning Japanese, the most important step is to learn Hiragana and Katakana, the writing alphabets of Japanese.

The best way I’ve found to do that is to make flashcards. Make sure you practice writing as well as recognizing them, this will not only be a great skill to have but will also reinforce the shapes in your mind.

Resources:

[Hiragana 42], the best guide I’ve found to learn the Hiragana (in a day!)
[Hiranana and Katakana Quiz Site]
[Kana Invaders Game]
[Anki] An amazing program that will make sure you never forget any Vocabulary….

The next step is to start learning vocabulary. Where can you find what to learn? Use a site like Memrise to find word lists (for example, there is a word list for all the vocabulary in starter textbooks like Genki), and use the amazing interface to learn them and keep them in your long term memory.

Resources:

[Memrise] as mentioned above to find and learn vocabulary lists.
[Most Common Words List]
[Anki] An amazing program that will make sure you never forget any Kanji….

While encountering vocabulary, you’re likely to be coming across super-complicated-looking Kanji. You can learn Kanji through Memrise as above, but there are some other websites that may be of interest.

Resources:

[Kanji Damage] A great site where you can learn Kanji through Mnemonics.[WaniKani] by the same people ho make TextFugu (below) can help you learn Kanji from scratch.
[Anki] An amazing program that will make sure you never forget any Kanji….

The next step is to apply that new vocabulary to grammar points and start making sentences.

If you can’t get your hands on textbooks like Genki, don’t fear! There are a lot of great online grammar resources.

Resources:

[TextFugu] a highly rated ‘online textbook’ which will guide you right from the beginning of learning Japanese.
[Guide to Japanese] another online textbook with a lot of grammar points and excellent explanations.

The Fun Parts: Using Japanese Online Media

So you probably have learnt Japanese because you have some interest in Japanese media. Time to start using it to your learning advantage!

Aside from the obvious watching Anime, J-dramas and films, why not try Reading Japanese News? Watching Japanese TV? Just make sure you are making these activities productive - note down new vocabulary, add them to Anki, and keep learning! It’s much easier to learn things you’re interested in. Try translating Japanese songs, etc.

The most important but difficult part of self-studying Japanese is getting your own compositions checked. Utilize all that grammar and vocabulary and write a short piece, it could be a diary entry or a short essay. Get it recorded for you by a native on RhinoSpike, and checked for grammar and consistencies on Lang-8.These sites also give you the chance to connect with Japanese natives, and perhaps start up some language exchanges!

For more resources, take a look at my Ultimate Resources List

http://nadinenihongo.tumblr.com/post/47984748297/ultimate-japanese-resources-list

Any more tips? Comment below!

(via doeki)

立て 立つ    v. to stand 
まで until
休み 休む やすむ to rest, to take a break (etc)
〜ましょう to do something together

急ぐ いそぐ v. to hurry, to rush
必要 ひつよう n. necessity, need (I know the first kanji is very stylized, but this is the only thing that works)

My super rough translation using what I just looked up!

If I am not standing, until I stand, let’s rest.

And Rilakkuma could be saying
No need to rush.
Thank you, guys! I put the “need” in the wrong spot when translating!

How do you translate it?

前向き (まえむき)

bandnihongo:

"Maemuki"

(n, na adj) Facing forward, proactive, positive

Example:

前も言ったけど常に俺たちは前向きだよ。(mae mo itta kedo tsuneni oretachi wa maemuki da yo)
"I’ve said it before, but we’re always being proactive."

I heard this word used often around graduation time in Japan.

conquerorwurm:

dizzydennis:

The passiveness of this sentence makes me laugh every time I see it.

There goes Godzilla, destroying the city.

(via julieyumi)

kirakiradoodles:

Some animals :3

nihononthego:

image

to be inside of; to be included in

A item/Location B item 入っています。
A item/Location ni B item wa haitteimasu.

Kanji: そのかばんにお母さんのサングラスは入っています。
Kana: そのかばんにおかあさんのサングラスははっています。
Romaji: Sono kaban ni okaasan no sangurasu wa haitteimasu.
English: Mom’s sunglasses are in that bag.

Kanji:…